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Alexander Wants New Higher Ed Law by End of Year

Alexander Wants New Higher Ed Law by End of Year

by Andrew Kreighbaum

A top staffer for Senator Lamar Alexander, a Tennessee Republican andchairman of the Senate education committee, said Monday that the senator wants to pass a reauthorization of the Higher Education Act before Christmas.

David Cleary, Alexander’s chief of staff, made the comments at an event hosted by the Education Writers Association.

In January 2018, Alexander offered a similarly ambitious timeline, saying he wanted his committee to mark up HEA legislation by April. But after multiple hearings focused on higher education, the Senate never made progress on crafting a bill last year.

 

Diverse Issues in Higher Education: House Education and Workforce Chair discusses priorities

Diverse Issues in Higher Education: House Education and Workforce Chair discusses priorities

In a half‐hour session Monday afternoon that seemed to pass faster than a New York minute, U.S. Rep. Bobby Scott, D‐Va., spoke and fielded a range of questions about education from about 40 media professionals attending a two‐day Education Writers Association seminar titled “Covering Higher Education’s New Political landscape.”

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Education Week: U.S. high school grad rate reaches another all‐time high. But what does it mean?

U.S. high school grad rate reaches another all‐time high. But what does it mean?

The U.S. high school graduation rate has risen for yet another year, to a new all‐time high of 84.6 percent. But even as
some celebrated the steady gains in high school completion, others worried that the pace of improvement is slowing,
and that the numbers tell a false story.
New figures released Thursday by the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics show
that 84.6 percent of the students in the class of 2016‐17 earned diplomas in four years. That’s a half‐point better than
in 2015‐16, when the graduation rate was 84.1 percent.  Read more

“: Looking to improve students’ mental health? Ask what they need”

Looking to improve students’ mental health? Ask what they need

By Lily Jackson

As part of its mental-health services, Jefferson Community College offers a food pantry and help with transportation.

Last year Katy Troester-Trate distributed Thanksgiving baskets overflowing with cans of cranberry sauce, dressing and biscuit mixes, green beans, and a gift card for a turkey to students.

Though handing out food may seem outside the usual job description for an interim dean of students, this is just one her many efforts to improve mental health on campus.

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Survey: Employers want “soft skills” from graduates

Survey: Employers Want ‘Soft Skills’ From Graduates

By Jeremy Bauer-Wolf

Employers want college graduates who have “soft skills,” such as being a good listener or thinking critically, but they have difficulty finding such candidates, according to a new report.

The survey was conducted online in September by Morning Consult for Cengage, an educational technology and services company, among more than 500 hiring managers and 150 more human resources professionals. More than 1,500 current and former college students from two- and four-year institutions were also surveyed.

The companies found that the most in-demand talent among employers was listening skills — 74 percent of employers indicated this was a skill they valued. This was followed by attention to detail (70 percent) and effective communication (69 percent).

About 73 percent of the employers said that finding qualified candidates was somewhat or very difficult. Roughly one-third of the employers (34 percent) indicated colleges and universities have not prepared students for jobs.

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